Stop Snoring: your New Year’s resolution

Stop Snoring: your New Year’s resolution

One third of people worldwide make a new year’s resolution every year. Is banishing snoring one of your resolutions?

Keeping a New Year’s goal in mind can be notoriously difficult; it’s estimated that only 8% of people manage to see their resolutions through. But if you keep your household awake all night, and your snoring causes endless arguments with your partner, you might want to make night-time noise a distant dream when stepping into 2020.

How to keep your new year’s resolution to stop snoring

The first step in reducing your snoring is to discover what’s causing it. Different products treat different types of snoring, so it’s important to find out what kind of snorer you are.

1) Everyday snoring. If your airway narrows too much while you sleep, the air you breathe is then pulled through it faster. This causes the soft tissue in the back of your throat to dehydrate and vibrate, causing the sound you hear as snoring.

Snoreeze Throat SprayOral Strips and Lozenges treat this type of snoring.

2) Snoring with congestion. When nasal tissue swells during a cold (or because of allergies), the airflow through the nose becomes blocked. This forces the air to travel faster and further dehydrate the tissue in your throat. Nasal congestion can make you snore in the night and have a dry mouth when you wake.

Snoreeze Nasal Spray and Nasal Strips treat this type of snoring.

3) Loud snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA).Snoring is caused by the soft tissue in the back of the throat vibrating when your airway relaxes during sleep. But in some cases, the airway becomes so narrow that the walls of the airway stick together and close up. This usually happens for around 10-30 seconds at a time, but can occur for longer – sometimes up to 50 times an hour or even more. When the airway finally opens up again, you might emit a loud, violent snore. This event is known as an apnoea.

The Snoreeze Oral Device and the Snoreeze LabFit Oral Device treat OSA and snoring by holding your jaw in the right position while you sleep. This opens your airway and helps you breathe. If you think you have OSA, you should visit your doctor as soon as possible – they’ll be able to recommend a suitable treatment.

 

If you’re not sure what type of snorer you are, click here to use our helpful diagnosis tool. We’ll analyse your symptoms and recommend the treatment that’s right for you.

New Year’s resolutions can be difficult to stick to. But by dealing with your snoring, you can say goodbye to bedtime arguments – and hello to a healthier and happier 2020.

 

 

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