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What is Nasal Congestion?

Hayfever

Snoring and nasal congestion – what is nasal congestion?

 ‘If only I could breathe through my nose, I would stop snoring now!’

 How many times have you thought that?  Blowing your nose is like trying to force your way through heavy traffic by driving closer to the car in front.  It just makes congestion worse.

 That is because the amount of catarrh in your nose, is only half of the congestion problem.

 Nasal congestion causes snoring – Snoring worsens nasal congestion

 It is a vicious circle.  Snoring is the sound of your body struggling to force air through too narrow airways.  Your narrowed airways collapse inwards with a loud rasping snore and become dry, sore and swollen.  Your body tries to protect the dry and inflamed membranes by over-producing the thick, sticky substance you recognise as catarrh.

 Heavy catarrh plus narrowed airways make congestion.  A cold, hay fever or other allergy will make that congestion worse and make you snore even more.

 Opening your airways eases nasal congestion and relieve snoring

 Snoreeze natural ingredients are formulated to ease congestion, relieve the discomfort of dry soreness by helping you breathe freely and easily through open airways.

 Natural peppermint extracts, menthols and eucalyptus oils in Snoreeze snoring relief oral strips, nasal and throat sprays reduce inflammation, soothe dry soreness and ease nasal congestion.

 Break the vicious circle of nasal congestion and problem snoring.  Breathe more easily, rest more easily and snore less with Snoreeze.

 

 

7 top tips for sleeping with a cold

We've all been there. You've felt fine all day, but as soon as your head hits the pillow...BAM! Your nose has transformed into a dripping tap and even breathing is a struggle.

Check out our 7 top tips for falling (and staying!) asleep when you've got a cold.

 

1. Go head over heels

There's nothing worse than struggling to drift off because you feel all bunged up.  Raising the level of your head while you sleep can really help to solve this problem by draining your sinuses.  Adding a few more pillows under your head may seem like a good idea, but this can force your neck to be at an uncomfortable angle, causing pain the following day.  Instead, try putting a few large books underneath your mattress.  This should raise your body from the waist up, rather than just raising your neck.  

 

2. Check your meds

You’ll probably need some sort of decongestant or flu medication before bed.  But beware; many of these kinds of medications contain caffeine or other stimulants.  That’s great during the day when you’re feeling run down and nee a pick-me-up, but taking them too close to bedtime can really disrupt your sleep.  Try to avoid any caffeinated drinks or medications after 3 or 4pm and opt for a special night-time cold and flu medication that will make you drowsy.   

 

3. Spray away

It's natural for most of us to breathe through our noses while we sleep, but this can be almost impossible if you're full of cold.  Nasal sprays are a great way to decongest your nasal passages when you’re all bunged up, helping you to breathe more easily throughout the night.  Many of these sprays contain stimulants, so many end up having a negative impact on your sleep. Snoreeze Nasal Spray is made from natural ingredients.  So, while it still decongests your nasal passages effectively, it won’t keep you awake at night.  

 

4. Get steamy

Repeatedly blowing your nose can irritate the skin on your face and leave you with a headache.  Having a hot shower or bath can help to clear your sinuses before bed. Placing a bowl of water on the radiator overnight can help to keep the room humid, stopping your throat from drying out and hopefully easing your tickly cough.   

 

5. Start stripping

We mean nasal strips, of course!  These little beauties work wonders when you’re struggling to breathe through your nose.  You apply one to the top of your nose and it works by holding your nostrils open to help the air get through.  Snoreeze Nasal Strips are hypoallergenic, latex free, and come in two different sizes.  They’re great because you can safely use them in combination with nasal sprays or decongestant medications. 

 

6. Optimise your sleep space

It’s difficult to sleep if your room is the wrong temperature, or if you have thin curtains letting outside light in.  Try and create a space that is perfect for sleep.  Get rid of all sources of light.  The darker your room is, the better.  Banish all gadgets, making sure to not look at any devices like smartphones or tablets just before bed as the blue light they emit has been proven to disrupt sleep. 

 

7. Roll over

Sleeping on your back can also increase your chances of snoring; something many people find themselves doing when suffering from a cold.  Try sleeping on your side instead.  If you're a natural back-sleeper, prop yourself up with a few pillows to make sure you don't roll back during the night.  (You might want to put a tissue or hand towel under your face to catch any mucus throughout the night...YUM!)   

3 reasons Christmas could ruin your sleep

Christmas is supposed to be a time for giving, but our YouGov survey revealed that suffering partners across the UK are having their sleep taken from them.  The festive season is fast approaching; and there’s more than one reason why it could be about to leave you having sleepless nights. 

Festive tipples

With the party season upon us, it’s likely that most people will be enjoying a couple of extra drinks over the next few weeks.  However, while you are blissfully unaware in your alcohol-induced slumber, you may well be disturbing the sleep of everyone around you. 13% of people in relationships who took part in the YouGov survey said that their partner snores after a tipple.  Alcohol leads to relaxed muscle tension in the upper airway.  This can lead to narrowed airways, the vibration of soft tissue, and the sound of snoring. Click here to see how drinking alcohol can influence snoring and what you can do to help the problem.

 

 Winter sniffles

Having a few too many mulled wines isn’t the only thing that could be causing you to snore this Christmas.  16% of those in relationships surveyed said that their partner snores when suffering from a cold or allergies.  Colds and a blocked nose can cause snoring as the nasal passages become congested.  This congestion limits airflow, increasing air turbulence and making you more likely to snore. Click here to see how having a cold or blocked nose can influence snoring and what you can do to help the problem.

 

 Christmas nibbles

Christmas is a time of indulgence and excess, particularly when it comes to food.  Overeating often leads to winter weight gain.  Many people don’t realise that being just a few kilograms overweight can really increase your risk of snoring.  Extra fat around your neck can cause the upper airways to narrow, limiting your ability to breathe freely.  Being overweight can also mean that you do not have the muscle tone necessary to keep your upper airway open while you sleep and prevent vibration of soft tissue in your throat.  Click here to see how weight can influence snoring and what you can do to help the problem.

 

With 22% of those in relationships with a snorer saying that they had slept in separate rooms to give themselves a break from the noise, it is clear that snoring could possibly create relationship difficulties.   This kind of relationship stress certainly doesn’t pave the way for a very merry Christmas, and snoring is a problem that couples can no longer afford to ignore.

It is a well-known fact that Santa only comes when you are sleeping, so make sure that snoring doesn’t stop you or your loved ones getting the rest you deserve this Christmas. 

Winter sniffles and snoring

As freezing temperatures are forecast to continue into the weekend, the UK is wrapping-up to stay warm in the run up to Christmas. For many of us, we’ve already received our first surprise gift of the festive season… a cold!

But what does a cold have to do with snoring?

Well, a lot more than you may think. A typical symptom of the common cold is a nasal congestion. This can cause obstruction of the nasal passages, forcing you to breathe through your mouth which can lead to snoring.

Nasal irritation often increases during the night which can further increase the impact that a blocked nose can have on snoring.

What can I do?

  • If you frequently suffer from nasal congestion because of a cold or flu, try to eat a healthy, balanced diet and drink plenty of fluids to boost your immune system. 
  • The cold virus is contagious and can be passed-on by another person if you come into an object they have touched. Washing your hands frequently can help to mimiize your risks of contracting a cold from this.
  • The cold virus can enter your body through you nose and eyes, so try to avoid frequently touching them with your hands.

This video by NHS Choices provides some useful information on how to prevent contracting a virus.

For those of you who are unlucky enough to catch a cold, try using Snoreeze Nasal Spray or Snoreeze Nasal Strips to relieve nasal congestion.

  • Snoreeze Nasal Spray – It’s unique blend of natural active ingredients coats the nasal passages and opens the airways to provide effective snoring relief for up to 8 hours. Available in a 10ml size, each bottle provides 25 applications.
  • Snoreeze Nasal Strips – Their flexible bands open the airways and improve airflow to provide effective snoring relief for up to 8 hours. Available in two sizes, Small/Medium and Large, each pack provides 20 applications.

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