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5 reasons your snoring could get you sacked

Snoring could not only have a negative impact on your personal life, but your professional life too. 

Here are 5 reasons why your snoring problem could end up getting you the sack:

 

1. Turning up late

38% of people struggle to get out of bed after a disturbed night’s sleep.  The bedtime battle where your partner repeatedly nudges you to silence your snores leaves you both getting little sleep.  No wonder your get-up-and-go has got-up-and-gone the next morning.  Risk factors like smoking and drinking alcohol can increase your chance of snoring.  If you find that you snore more whilst on your back, try sleeping on the side and placing a pillow behind you to stop you rolling back.

Struggle to get out of bed

2. Snapping at your boss

54% of people say they are more irritable after a disturbed night’s sleep.  After being jabbed in the ribs 47 times in the night, it’s no wonder you’re more likely to snap at your boss.   And with 24% of people claiming to be more emotionally sensitive than normal, you can’t rule out an emotional breakdown by the watercooler.  For most people, snoring is caused by relaxed muscle tension at the back of the throat.  Products like throat sprays and throat rinses can help to tighten and lubricate the soft tissues, preventing snoring.

3. Slacking on the job

If you are sat staring into space, your boss might be under the impression that you are slacking.  But perhaps they should be blaming your partner for whacking you with a pillow each time you let out a snore.  48% of people surveyed said they found it harder to concentrate after a disturbed night’s sleep, with 34% admitting they are less productive at work.  If you snore when you’ve got a cold or are suffering from allergies, nasal snoring relief products can really help.  Nasal spray helps to decongest your nasal passages and nasal strips help to open your airways, so you can breathe more easily and shouldn’t snore.  

Struggle to concentrate

4. Yawning in your big morning meeting

Even if you don’t have a partner to wake you at night, recent studies have found that snoring alone causes the snorer to suffer daytime sleepiness[i].  The exact reason for this is still up for debate.  It could be down to fatigue caused by the increased effort of breathing, or being in a constantly light sleep due to the noise you’re making.  If you regularly travel with work, taking a snoring spray in your bag can be a bit inconvenient.  Things like oral strips and lozenges would give you a more practical solution.  They fit easily in to your hand luggage and work on the same principal as other throat products, tightening and lubricating the soft tissues to stop you snoring.

5. Falling asleep at your desk

Sleeping on the job is always going to get you in big trouble with your boss.  But, if you snore and find yourself drifting off when you don’t intend to (like at your desk or while driving), it could be a sign of something serious.  Sleep apnoea is a condition where your airway relaxes and narrows so much that airflow to your lungs is stopped.  You end up having broken sleep as your brain wakes you to reopen the airway.  Sleep apnoea is linked to heart disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke, and depression – so there is much more at stake than losing your job.  If you’re suffering from mild/moderate sleep apnoea, something as simple as the Snoreeze Oral Device (it’s a bit like a gum-shield) can keep your airway open at night, helping you to breathe normally and stopping your snoring.       

Sleepy in the daytime



All figures, unless otherwise stated, are from YouGov Plc.  Total sample size was 2,058 adults. Fieldwork was undertaken between 15th - 16th October 2014.  The survey was carried out online. The figures have been weighted and are representative of all UK adults (aged 18+).

[i] Daniel J. Gottlieb, Qing Yao, Susan Redline, Tauqeer Ali, Mark W. Mahowald. "Does Snoring Predict Sleepiness Independently of Apnea and Hypopnea Frequency?" American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 162, No. 4 (2000), pp. 1512-1517.

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