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Is Your Bad Breath A Symptom of Snoring?

Do you wake up with bad breath every morning? There’s a good chance that snoring could be to blame. Over 71% of snorers admit to having terrible morning breath – and mouth-breathing is nearly always the cause.

Having a dry mouth is the main reason why people wake up with bad breath. When we go to sleep, our saliva production decreases. But many people who snore or have sleep apnoea experience severe drying of the mouth because they tend to breathe through their mouths instead of their noses. Saliva is a natural antibiotic, and a dry mouth means that bacteria are able to flourish.

Bad -Breath

When someone snores, their airway is narrowing far too much. Fast-travelling air is pulled through it when they breathe, dehydrating the tissue at the back of their throat, and causing it to vibrate. This sound is what we know as snoring. If the person’s body feels like it isn’t getting enough oxygen, it might open their mouth to try and increase the air flow. But breathing through your mouth speeds up the drying process, and it results in bad breath come morning.

 

How can you fix bad breath caused by snoring?

 

There are several options to choose from when it comes to fixing your bad breath. Using a snore guard is one method – a sort of mouldable mouth guard that encourages you to breathe through your nose by blocking your mouth. Nasal dilators can also be used: small devices that you insert up your nostrils to reduce any resistance to incoming air. However, some people can find these uncomfortable to sleep in.

Another option is to use a nasal spray, or nasal strips. If you’re breathing through your mouth because your nose is blocked, then anti-snoring nasal products will help open up your airways again. Many people with colds start to snore when they become ill – using a nasal spray or nasal strips helps them sleep peacefully through the night.

 

Remember: mouth-breathing isn’t normal

 

Breathing through your mouth is abnormal, and if you already snore, it could be a sign of a more serious condition like sleep apnoea. Visit your doctor if you’re worried about your mouth-breathing – ignoring it could lead to high blood pressure and even coronary heart disease. Dealing with your bad breath now means that you’ll reap other health benefits in years to come.

 

Know your number; snoring, blood pressure and your health

Numbers

Every year around 125,000 adults suffer heart attacks or stroke through high blood pressure that could be reduced if they knew to stop snoring.

You probably know that you snore.  But, you might not know your blood pressure or even what your blood pressure should be.  That is why Blood Pressure UK are promoting ‘Know Your Numbers Week’ starting on 18th September.

What is high blood pressure?

Your Doctor measures your blood pressure and gives it as 2 numbers.  The first number measures the pressure of your blood as your heart beats and pushes blood around your body.  The second figure measurers the pressure of your blood as your heart rests between beats.

If the first number is more than 90 but less than 120 and the second number is between 60 and 80, then your blood pressure reading is ideal and healthy.

However, if that first figure is between 120 and 140, then you are in ‘pre-high blood pressure’.  Over 140 and you have ‘high blood pressure’.  This can also be known as hypertension and is a key factor in your risk of heart attack, stroke and even kidney disease.

How is blood pressure damaging to your health?

Your blood carries oxygen from your lungs and other nutrients around your body.  It needs to be under some pressure to move it through your blood vessels.  The beats of your heart supply the pressure that pushes your blood through these vessels.

Snoring is a sign that your breathing is not as efficient whilst you are asleep.  Inefficient breathing results in not enough oxygen getting to your lungs.  Therefore, your heart has to beat harder and faster to get oxygen around your body.  This extra work creates a higher than normal pressure in your blood vessels.  Over worked hearts are more likely to fail, potentially sparking a fatal heart attack.  Over-stressed blood vessels are more likely to leak or even burst.  Blood leaking into the brain is the cause of stroke.

Research is providing more and more evidence that sleep related breathing disorders, such as obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) – an extreme form of the disorder characterised by heaving snoring are linked to high blood pressure.

Know your Numbers – Snoring and high blood pressure

There are about 25 million snorers in the UK.  That is about 40% of the population.  An estimated 1.5 million adults in the UK are thought to have the severe snoring condition OSA.  85% of these are undiagnosed and untreated.  An estimated 50% of patients with hypertension also have OSA.  Studies into the effect on blood pressure, for patients receiving OSA treatment showed that it is also lowered their blood pressure.

How to stop snoring and reduce your risk of hypertension

Studies indicate that taking action to reduce your snoring, or other sleep related breathing disorders, can help reduce your blood pressure and your risk of heart attack and stroke.

If you think you might have the severe sleep related breathing disorder OSA Obstructive Sleep Apnoea you should see your doctor.  Stop snoring and OSA therapies might include CPAP, constant positive airway pressure and the Snoreeze Oral Device.

Snoreeze offer a range of snoring relief nasal and throat sprays, throat rinse, dissolve in the mouth oral tabs and external support nasal strips, all developed to relieve airway narrowing and increase the natural hydration of your nasal and throat lining.

For heavy snoring, the Snoreeze Oral Device helps maintain a free and silent airflow through the airways and throat, in the form of a fully adjustable mouthpiece that gently holds your jaw forward as you sleep.

*Sleep apnoea is a common disorder in which you have one or more pauses in breathing or shallow breaths whilst you sleep.  Breathing pauses can last from a few seconds to minutes.  They may occur 30 times or more an hour.  Typical, normal breathing then starts again, sometimes with a loud snort or choking sound.  If you suspect you have OSA, we recommend you see your doctor.

 

What type of snorer are you?

Choosing The Right Product

What Type of Snorer Are You?

 Choosing the right treatment to solve your snoring problem means knowing a little about why you snore, how you snore and what makes your snoring worse. Let us help you understand what is going on and how snoring relief aids help you treat the cause of your snoring.

 Snoring might seem to you like the problem itself. But really, it is only the most obvious symptom of a much more serious underlying problem. The root cause of snoring is ‘sleep disordered breathing’.  The only effective way to stop your snoring is to treat the root cause.

 Every-night snoring

Regular snoring can be very loud with more impact on the sleep of your partner than on yours. The main cause of this type of snoring is dehydration and relaxed airways that collapse in on themselves when you sleep. This allows the soft lining of the airways to vibrate causing the rasping sound of snoring. 

 Allergy, Cold and Blocked Nose Snoring

A blocked nose, cold or allergy and make you snore at certain times of the year.  Allergic reactions to dust, pollen, animal material or a virus causes nasal congestion that restricts airflow through the nasal passages. Congestion can cause you to breathe your mouth drying your throat and increasing the vibrations that lead to snoring. 

 Snoring caused by interrupted breathing whilst sleeping

If you are suffering daytime tiredness or sleepiness during the day, or if your loud and sudden snoring frequently wakes your partner, you might be suffering the sleep related breathing disorder, sleep apnoea.  The most common form of sleep apnoea, obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), is caused when lack of muscle tone in the upper airway allows it to collapse, or when the soft palate at the back of the throat partially or fully closes the airway.  If you experience any of these symptoms your doctor will be able to talk to you about the available treatments.

 Seasonal, occasional or now-and-again snoring

Some snoring is difficult to label or tie down to a particular time or cause.  It might be you only snore when you have got a cold or had too good a night out, sleep in a strange bed or place. There might be a number of factors causing your snoring, but they are probably all made worse by nasal congestion and dryness in your throat. 

 Embarrassing and Away-From-Home Snoring

Snoring away from home, particularly among strangers and new acquaintances can be embarrassing.    We offer compact, dry products ideal for travellers and easily carried in hand luggage.

Snoreeze snoring relief aids offer a complete range of effective products to help you stop snoring and tailored to the way you snore and the way you live.

 

 

 

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