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Archive for tag: blocked nose

5 ways to stop hay fever ruining your sleep

It's estimated that 25% of the UK population suffer from hay fever.  When you're all bunged up and your eyes are itchy, it's hard to get the sleep you need.  

Here are our 5 top tips for making sure you don't lose sleep over hay fever this year.

 

1. Lather, rinse, repeat

Pollen is sticky and can stay in your hair until washed out properly.  The last thing you want is to get pollen on your pillow and end up having an allergy attack in the middle of the night.  Pollen can also stay on your clothes for hours after you have been outside. Shower before bed to remove any pollen from your skin, and get dressed in the bathroom so that pollen from your clothes doesn't contaminate your bedroom.  

 

2. Get your feather duster out

Vaccuum to remove any pollen that has settled on the floor or in your carpet. Using a damp cloth when you dust will also help to make sure that dust and pollen cling to the cloth, rather than just being spread around.  It's tempting to leave your bedroom windows open during the summer, but try to leave them closed during the day when the pollen count is highest.  

 

3. Don't hang your sheets out to dry

The summer months are great for being able to get your laundry washed and dried quickly.  But hanging your bedding out when the pollen count is high could prove to be a silly mistake.  Try drying your bedding on a clothes horse indoors.  It takes a little longer, but it should reduce the amount of pollen on the sheets and put an end to your night-time sneezing fits. 

 

4. Put a spoonful of honey in your bedtime drink

Many people believe that eating locally-produced honey can help to reduce hay fever symptoms*.  The theory is that the pollen contained in the honey will help to build up your immunity to the allergens around you.  And let's face it, even if this method hasn't been fully backed by clinical trials just yet, it's a solution that's tasty to try!

 

5. Decongest your nasal passages

Recent studies show links between certain hay fever medications and conditions such as Alzheimers** - prompting people to turn to more natural remedies as a solution for their runny, blocked noses.  Pollen allergies can cause your nasal passages to become inflamed and swollen, making it hard for you to breathe through your nose.  As well as making it hard for you to fall asleep, this congestion limits airflow, increasing air turbulence and making you more likely to snore.  The natural ingredients in Snoreeze Nasal Spray help to decongest your nasal passages, meaning that you can breathe easily again - and the great news is, it's safe to use every night!

 

http://www.itv.com/news/london/2014-05-21/could-a-spoon-of-local-honey-a-day-cure-hayfever/

** http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/science/science-news/11370231/Drugs-like-Nytol-and-Piriton-raise-risk-of-Alzheimers-disease-say-scientists.html

 

3 reasons Christmas could ruin your sleep

Christmas is supposed to be a time for giving, but our YouGov survey revealed that suffering partners across the UK are having their sleep taken from them.  The festive season is fast approaching; and there’s more than one reason why it could be about to leave you having sleepless nights. 

Festive tipples

With the party season upon us, it’s likely that most people will be enjoying a couple of extra drinks over the next few weeks.  However, while you are blissfully unaware in your alcohol-induced slumber, you may well be disturbing the sleep of everyone around you. 13% of people in relationships who took part in the YouGov survey said that their partner snores after a tipple.  Alcohol leads to relaxed muscle tension in the upper airway.  This can lead to narrowed airways, the vibration of soft tissue, and the sound of snoring. Click here to see how drinking alcohol can influence snoring and what you can do to help the problem.

 

 Winter sniffles

Having a few too many mulled wines isn’t the only thing that could be causing you to snore this Christmas.  16% of those in relationships surveyed said that their partner snores when suffering from a cold or allergies.  Colds and a blocked nose can cause snoring as the nasal passages become congested.  This congestion limits airflow, increasing air turbulence and making you more likely to snore. Click here to see how having a cold or blocked nose can influence snoring and what you can do to help the problem.

 

 Christmas nibbles

Christmas is a time of indulgence and excess, particularly when it comes to food.  Overeating often leads to winter weight gain.  Many people don’t realise that being just a few kilograms overweight can really increase your risk of snoring.  Extra fat around your neck can cause the upper airways to narrow, limiting your ability to breathe freely.  Being overweight can also mean that you do not have the muscle tone necessary to keep your upper airway open while you sleep and prevent vibration of soft tissue in your throat.  Click here to see how weight can influence snoring and what you can do to help the problem.

 

With 22% of those in relationships with a snorer saying that they had slept in separate rooms to give themselves a break from the noise, it is clear that snoring could possibly create relationship difficulties.   This kind of relationship stress certainly doesn’t pave the way for a very merry Christmas, and snoring is a problem that couples can no longer afford to ignore.

It is a well-known fact that Santa only comes when you are sleeping, so make sure that snoring doesn’t stop you or your loved ones getting the rest you deserve this Christmas. 

Winter sniffles and snoring

As freezing temperatures are forecast to continue into the weekend, the UK is wrapping-up to stay warm in the run up to Christmas. For many of us, we’ve already received our first surprise gift of the festive season… a cold!

But what does a cold have to do with snoring?

Well, a lot more than you may think. A typical symptom of the common cold is a nasal congestion. This can cause obstruction of the nasal passages, forcing you to breathe through your mouth which can lead to snoring.

Nasal irritation often increases during the night which can further increase the impact that a blocked nose can have on snoring.

What can I do?

  • If you frequently suffer from nasal congestion because of a cold or flu, try to eat a healthy, balanced diet and drink plenty of fluids to boost your immune system. 
  • The cold virus is contagious and can be passed-on by another person if you come into an object they have touched. Washing your hands frequently can help to mimiize your risks of contracting a cold from this.
  • The cold virus can enter your body through you nose and eyes, so try to avoid frequently touching them with your hands.

This video by NHS Choices provides some useful information on how to prevent contracting a virus.

For those of you who are unlucky enough to catch a cold, try using Snoreeze Nasal Spray or Snoreeze Nasal Strips to relieve nasal congestion.

  • Snoreeze Nasal Spray – It’s unique blend of natural active ingredients coats the nasal passages and opens the airways to provide effective snoring relief for up to 8 hours. Available in a 10ml size, each bottle provides 25 applications.
  • Snoreeze Nasal Strips – Their flexible bands open the airways and improve airflow to provide effective snoring relief for up to 8 hours. Available in two sizes, Small/Medium and Large, each pack provides 20 applications.

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