Know your number; snoring, blood pressure and your health

Numbers

Every year around 125,000 adults suffer heart attacks or stroke through high blood pressure that could be reduced if they knew to stop snoring.

You probably know that you snore.  But, you might not know your blood pressure or even what your blood pressure should be.  That is why Blood Pressure UK are promoting ‘Know Your Numbers Week’ starting on 18th September.

What is high blood pressure?

Your Doctor measures your blood pressure and gives it as 2 numbers.  The first number measures the pressure of your blood as your heart beats and pushes blood around your body.  The second figure measurers the pressure of your blood as your heart rests between beats.

If the first number is more than 90 but less than 120 and the second number is between 60 and 80, then your blood pressure reading is ideal and healthy.

However, if that first figure is between 120 and 140, then you are in ‘pre-high blood pressure’.  Over 140 and you have ‘high blood pressure’.  This can also be known as hypertension and is a key factor in your risk of heart attack, stroke and even kidney disease.

How is blood pressure damaging to your health?

Your blood carries oxygen from your lungs and other nutrients around your body.  It needs to be under some pressure to move it through your blood vessels.  The beats of your heart supply the pressure that pushes your blood through these vessels.

Snoring is a sign that your breathing is not as efficient whilst you are asleep.  Inefficient breathing results in not enough oxygen getting to your lungs.  Therefore, your heart has to beat harder and faster to get oxygen around your body.  This extra work creates a higher than normal pressure in your blood vessels.  Over worked hearts are more likely to fail, potentially sparking a fatal heart attack.  Over-stressed blood vessels are more likely to leak or even burst.  Blood leaking into the brain is the cause of stroke.

Research is providing more and more evidence that sleep related breathing disorders, such as obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) – an extreme form of the disorder characterised by heaving snoring are linked to high blood pressure.

Know your Numbers – Snoring and high blood pressure

There are about 25 million snorers in the UK.  That is about 40% of the population.  An estimated 1.5 million adults in the UK are thought to have the severe snoring condition OSA.  85% of these are undiagnosed and untreated.  An estimated 50% of patients with hypertension also have OSA.  Studies into the effect on blood pressure, for patients receiving OSA treatment showed that it is also lowered their blood pressure.

How to stop snoring and reduce your risk of hypertension

Studies indicate that taking action to reduce your snoring, or other sleep related breathing disorders, can help reduce your blood pressure and your risk of heart attack and stroke.

If you think you might have the severe sleep related breathing disorder OSA Obstructive Sleep Apnoea you should see your doctor.  Stop snoring and OSA therapies might include CPAP, constant positive airway pressure and the Snoreeze Oral Device.

Snoreeze offer a range of snoring relief nasal and throat sprays, throat rinse, dissolve in the mouth oral tabs and external support nasal strips, all developed to relieve airway narrowing and increase the natural hydration of your nasal and throat lining.

For heavy snoring, the Snoreeze Oral Device helps maintain a free and silent airflow through the airways and throat, in the form of a fully adjustable mouthpiece that gently holds your jaw forward as you sleep.

*Sleep apnoea is a common disorder in which you have one or more pauses in breathing or shallow breaths whilst you sleep.  Breathing pauses can last from a few seconds to minutes.  They may occur 30 times or more an hour.  Typical, normal breathing then starts again, sometimes with a loud snort or choking sound.  If you suspect you have OSA, we recommend you see your doctor.

 

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